Area Code Search

() XXX- XXXX

Exchange Code Search

() - XXXX

Area Codes

An area code is the three digit number that begins all North American phone numbers. This number helps to identify the region in which a phone number originated. Public information on what carrier a phone number belongs to is also relayed in the phone number. This is communicated in what is called the exchange code or the second set of three digit numbers. In other words, the 555 in the following string, ### - 555 - ####.

Thanks to number portability tracing the carrier of a phone number is no longer as accurate as it used to be. As such, it is more accurate to describedour search tools as finding the carrier a in which a number was originally issued to, not currently issues.

How do I know if a number is a cellular phone or home phone number?

This question is often asked of us. Assuming the phone number was not ported from another type of service (ie switching a landline phone number to a mobile phone number), you should be able to determine the type of service using what is called the exchange code. This is the second set of three digits in a ten digit US phone number (ie. (xxx) xxx-xxxx). The first set of three digits represents the area code, and the last four digits distinguish the user.

An entire phone number can be thought of as such:

(XXX) XXX-XXXX

Wherein:

(XXX) = Area code identifies the location.

XXX = Exchange code identifies the service provider and type of phone.

XXXX = User identifies who owns the phone number.

This categorization system is also known as the North American Numbering Plan (NANP) and if you visit the NANP administrations website you can find out more. Now, it is important to point out that with wireless number portability, these identifiers may not always be 100% accurate. In fact, it is likely that in the future these phone codes may not help much at all. For now, this will help identify many numbers as either landline or cell phone.

Now, since all of this can sometimes be a bit daunting we thought we would also try to provide a tool (or tools) that may also help. Below you will find an area code search box which you can use to find the wireless exchanges which exist in that particular area code. Depending upon the size of the area code this list can be pretty long, so if you would rather search using the area code and exchange, you can use our search box above.

After receiving a number questions such as "How do I find out where a caller is dialing from?” or "Where is xxx-xxx-xxxx (a phone number) located?” we thought we would try to offer a tool which can be used to find this information.  Below you will find two search boxes that you can use to locate the origin of a phone number by area code or more precisely by area code + exchange.  Now, both should work on residential, business (toll numbers only), and mobile phones, however, with the ability to port a wireless number to a new provider some of the information may not always be 100% accurate (for more details on number portability see this article).

To search for information on the area code or exchange you are looking for, enter it above and click search